The Mechanical Turk or The Turk was an automated chess playing machine, constructed in the late 17th century and patented by Wolfgang von Kempelen, as token for his affection towards the Empress of Austria, Maria Theresa.

                  It was later revealed to be a hoax, the proclaimed-automaton was installed with a secret compartment in which a chess master could hide inside and operate the machine.

The Turk appeared to be able to play a strong game of chess against a human opponent. During the Turk’s campaign from 1770-1854(84 years), The Turk played and vanquished many challengers including the likes of revolutionary-thinkers such as: Napoleon Bonaparte and Benjamin Franklin.

Wolfgang von Kempelen died in 1804. Yet, the automaton continued to compete for another 50 years, after Johann Nepomak Malzel purchase the machine.

Johann Allgaier, Boncourt, Aaron Alexandre, William Lewis, Jacques Mouret and William Schlumberger are some of the turk’s operators, however the original chess players during time Kempelen possessed the machine, is still a mystery.

 

 

The law of the mechanical turk in the workforce.

Law of Mechanical Turk- a crowd-sourcing internet marketplace that enables individuals or businesses(known as Requesters) to coordinate the use of human intelligence to perform tasks that computers are currently unable to do.

The law of the mechanical turk has been integrated into the workforce, not just for idle screen-watchers but for pedestrians caught between Associate degrees and retirement.

To put it mildly, any task–Any Task that would otherwise call for a professional, expert, or all around insensitive know-it-all, can be downgraded and monetized. The Breaking down of huge complex tasks/jobs into intricate parts, and replacing with a paint-by-the-numbers crew. Thus, giving the illusion of productivity for the cost of creativity and innovation. Outsourcing your golden goose to keep profit margins in the green, is the truest example of a fool’s gambit.

Meanwhile, the educational system continues to feed the beast, shuffling out more test takers and honor roll inductees–keeping the Telsas of our generation riding the trial and error roller-coaster or the minimum wage scavenger hunt.

The Mechanical Turk is a symbol of industrialism, reducing the business model into its smallest and crudest form: boss and workers. Which raises a bunch of eyebrows when contemplating questions like: Why pay a digital media specialist to do my direct marketing, when I can get 6 space monkeys with an enormous amount of student debt, to do it for me on the weekends, for less the cost. Maybe not in this manner, but you get the underlining message.

     What that means for the rest of us.

The machines are coming; embrace the “Age of the Hyphens”. Soon, factory jobs will be automated by machines and artifical intelligence. A pandemic of micro-terminators staggering and shuffling product on and off the assembly line. Leaving not a job left in sight unless you are the  mechanic.  An interesting part in history is taking place before our very eyes. The average person will need at least 5 side projects in order to make a living, and I do mean “Projects”, because the low-paying remedial jobs won’t available .

So, the question is: what will you do when all your excuses are gone? The things that was, at one time, considered too risky–now, it is your lifeline. Working overtime for Walmart won’t save you, anymore. And the only way to earn a living is to become the rock-star, you dreamed you could be; the painter and works of art you fantasized about creating; the novelist and the stories you wished to show the world.

What will you do when playing it is riskier than living your purpose?

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